Tag Archives: winter weather

  • Beware These 5 Common Natural Disasters

    My family used to live on the edge of Tornado Alley. Since we saw tornado warnings every year, our 72-hour kits were extremely portable.

    Now we live in an area where tornadoes are extremely unlikely, yet earthquakes are a real possibility. Our home does not stand in an area with a major flood or fire risk that could require immediate evacuation. So our 72-hour kit is less portable and in stronger containers.

    If people know what natural disasters are more likely in their location, they can better prepare, argued Kevin Borden and Susan Cutter from the Department of Geography of the University of South Carolina in a 2008 study.

    Common Natural Resources - All National Weather Service

    “Improved understanding of how to react in a hazard event will contribute to reduced deaths from hazard events in high-mortality areas,” they wrote.

    Some types of natural disasters are prevalent everywhere.

    Here’s a list of five common natural disasters with the highest mortality rates, according to the University of South Carolina study.

     

    Heat or Drought

    Common Natural Disasters - Drought

    In 2014, heat killed an estimated 124 people, more than any other type of natural disaster, according to the National Weather Service.

    A stagnant atmosphere and poor air quality creates prime conditions for heat-related illness, according to ready.gov. Urban areas face higher risk of heat disasters because asphalt and concrete store more heat during the day and release it more slowly at night than unpaved land does.

    Drought can contaminate water supplies and create food shortages. It can also cause other natural disasters, like the 1988 Yellowstone wildfires.

     

    Summer Weather

    This category includes fog, thunderstorms, wind, and hail. These types of weather can hit throughout the year.

     

     

    Floods

    Common Natural Disasters - FloodsFlooding killed an average of 71 people per year in the last 10 years, according to the National Weather Service. Almost half were due to people trying to cross flooded roads or overflowing streams or rivers, according to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. Vehicles float in only 18 inches of water. Six inches can make a person fall. Flash floods can require evacuation in minutes.

     

    Tornadoes

    Common Natural Disasters - Tornadoes In the last 10 years, tornadoes killed an average of 110 people per year.

    A category five tornado in May 2011 in Joplin, Mo., killed 160 people in 38 minutes. It was the costliest tornado in U.S. history, causing $2.8 billion in damages, according to 24/7 Wall Street. Another in Moore, Okla., in 2013, killed 49 people, more than 40 percent children, and caused nearly $2.5 billion in damage.

     

    The first four types of natural disaster – heat, storms, winter weather, and floods – are fairly frequent in every state. Tornadoes are less frequent in some states though they have touched down in every one. According to the University of South Carolina study, it’s not as important how often deaths from natural disasters occur as where.

    “Even if researchers could definitively assert the 'deadliest hazard,' a better issue to pose is where residents are more susceptible to fatalities from natural hazards within the United States,” they wrote.

    You can find out what common natural disasters your state is most prone to at Your State Perils,

    The Deep South and Mountain West have the highest mortality rates.

    Alabama led the nation in per capita deaths from all types of natural disasters during the last five years, according to 24/7 Wall Street. In 2014, 63 people there died from extreme temperatures, 54 people died from wind, 47 died from tornadoes, and 38 died from flooding. Each figure was the highest in the nation.

    The other eight states in 24/7 Wall Street’s story with high mortality rates from natural disasters include, in order from greatest to least, Missouri, Wyoming, Arkansas, Nevada, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Montana and Tennessee.

    While there are more dangers than just the aforementioned occurrences, these five common natural disasters are definitely ones to watch out for. Know the threats in the area in which you live and travel and plan accordingly.

     

    What are some common natural disasters in your area? Let us know how you prepare for them!

    Posted In: Disaster Scenarios Tagged With: summer weather, heat, common natural disasters, drought, winter weather, Tornado, flood

  • Staying Toasty in Texas: No Power? No Problem!

    If you couldn't adjust the thermostat when temperatures dropped, how would you keep your home warm?

    We've been talking a lot lately about harsh winter weather; we expect winter weather each year, yet it’s still unpredictable. Icy roads, flights canceled, extreme cold, and disrupted water services are only a few of the possibilities when winter gets particularly vicious. Another example of winter trouble comes from North Texas, where the city of Jacksboro was almost completely without a natural gas supply to heat houses and public buildings for some 1,200 customers.

    A local CBS affiliate reports that liquid in the pipes caused pilot lights to go out and gas to build up in the lines. Whatever the cause, however, the result was a city-wide shutdown of Jacksboro’s gas supply. And just in time for below freezing temperatures.

    So if you weren't able to just adjust the thermostat when the temperature dropped to “uncomfortable,” would you know how to keep your home warm?

    Our article on emergency warmth includes some helpful tips for staying warm both at home and on the road. You can also find a great list of smart ways to keep a house warm without power at this wiki, and some safety considerations when using non-traditional heating methods from the NC State Extension.

    Your advice? What are your tips for staying warm without power?

    Here’s wishing everyone a safe and warm winter!

    --Stacey

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: emergency heat, emergency warmth, winter weather, power outage, power, warmth, emergency power

  • Winter Storm Brings Rain, Snow, and Ice Across the Country

    Hey friends,

    According to Weather.com, there’s a big winter storm brewing—well, two storms, actually. Much-needed rain arrived in California today, and forecasts show there’s more on the way.

    Weather Channel_Wet Weather in the West_26Feb 2014

    While California revels in the much-needed water, other parts of the country are bracing for an ice storm on Sunday and into Monday—a storm that could reach as far south as Nashville. Read more at Weather.com.

    It seems like the weather this year has been both a blessing and a curse—it just depends on where you live.

    What’s your reaction to this set of storms? Are you grateful for the rain and snow, or wishing Mother Nature would just give you a break already?

     

    --Urban Girl

     

     

    Photo via Weather.com

    Posted In: Uncategorized Tagged With: winter weather, Weather

  1. 1-3 of 5 items

Please wait...